Apple fanboys breathe a sigh of relief.

Just the other day the Apple app store (used for getting third party applications on to non-jailbroken iPhones and iPads) refused an application which was designed to share a particular artists political satire cartoons.  The internet erupted in protests about this latest bit of censorship from apple.  A lot of people emailed Steve Jobs directly, to which one person received the following reply.

Fiore’s app will be in the store shortly. That was a mistake. However, we do believe we have a moral responsibility to keep porn off the iPhone. Folks who want porn can buy and [sic] Android phone.

So basically, if you want porn get an Android.  Well, thanks to some nifty programmers, Apple fanboys worldwide are breathing a huge sigh of relief.  Thanks to him they can get their porn and keep their iPhone at the same time.

PlanetBeing has developed a way that you can install Android on to (and dual-boot) an iPhone!  The fanboys will be extatic!  They can eat their cake and have it too!

Go to PlanetBeing’s blog for more details and a video of it in action.

Advertisements

The fanboy and the antifanboy.

We should all be familiar with what a “fanboy” is.  They’re someone of any gender (male, female and/or misc) who is an overly passionate fan of a certain brand.  This brand could be anything from a cereal brand, car manufacturer, band, musician, actor, actress, IT company, sports star … the list goes on.

So what term would one use to describe someone that is the opposite.  That is, someone who is overly passionate against a certain brand.  Being an IT worker I see the fanboys and antifanboys the most when it comes to software manufacturers.  Apple probably has the most passionate fanboys, who fawn over any and every product they release, have multiple versions of every product from phones to music players, computers, laptops.  The most passionate antifanboys though are shared equally between Apple, Microsoft and Adobe.  People who use any excuse they can to rip on any and all products from those manufacturers.  Just take a quick look at the iPad hate before and after its release. Continue reading

We only like you because you’re good in blog.

It’s April 22nd here in Australia which means according to the SheThought.com blog (which incidentally I suggest you read), it’s time for me and all other self professed skeptics around the world to blog about blogging.

The topic I’ve decided to cover on blogging is comments, or more specifically spam.  Comments in themselves are a huge thing that most first time bloggers don’t usually realise will become such a drama, but it is something worth thinking about.  What kind of moderation will you put in place?  What automated systems?  How will you handle abusive comments?  Trolls (people who post purely to upset others)?  Fights?  Threats?

These are all things to think about, and on this blog here I have yet to actually decide on a policy myself despite this blog being well over a year old already.  I have full moderation turned on, meaning I have to approve every single comment.  I want it this way until I decide on a policy as I don’t want to be pulling comments that have already appeared.  I am also yet to refuse a comment submission with one exception.  That exception being, if it looked like spam. Continue reading

2.6 MILLION instances of infected ads since late December.

Since late December, anti-virus company Avast! has stated there have been over 2.6 MILLION instances caught by their software of online ads infected with malware being served up to computers.  It’s not just by the small and dodgy ad companies either.

The biggest culprits were Yahoo’s Yield Manager and Fox’s Fimserve which cover more than 50 percent of online ads.  Google’s DoubleClick wasn’t immune either, but its representation was significantly lower.

Most people will say be careful where you click, but this doesn’t help in the case of this particular infection (and many others).  All you had to do was visit a website displaying one and have a program installed they were capable of exploiting.  These programs include (but are not limited to) Adobe Acrobat, Adobe Flash, Sun Java and Apple QuickTime.

A common mistake people make is thinking they’re safe by only going to legitimate sites, but this is wrong as well.  The New York Times, Drudge Report, TechCrunch, WhitePages (US), NineMSN (AU), Fairfax (AU) just to name a few have all fallen victim of malicious ads on their websites in the past 12 months.

More details and my recommendations on how to protect yourself after the break. Continue reading

Another apple release, another lovers vs haters battle.

The cult of mac have released another product today, and as expected the news sites are filled with information about it as though it’s the only thing that has happened in the past month. It’s amazing how Apple seem to be the only tech company who can drum up the attention normally reserved for celebrities and drama queens.  Even massacres and natural disasters struggle at times.

Along with all the media attention, the public has also gone in to a frenzy. Once again tied between the fanboys who think it’s the greatest thing since the last Apple release/the previous Apple release/the previous Apple release/rinse, repeat/sliced bread, and the Apple haters who like to counter the rabid Apple fans with equally rabid opposition.

What neither side seems to understand is that Apple products, like just about all products (IT and non-IT) have their place. They all have their purpose.  When the MacBook Air came out we had the same thing, many people saying it was too limited, others saying it suited them perfectly.  I’m in the camp of it being too limited for me, but just because it doesn’t suit me doesn’t mean I should be running around all but trolling those to whom it does suit. Continue reading

Think you’re too observant to have your card skimmed?

Blown up ATM.Think again.  A few days ago I tweeted a news story about how Australia is seen as a soft target for ATM card skimming gangs.  A few hours later a friend responded with an article from Lifehacker with tips on spotting ATM’s that have been tampered with.  Unfortunately, it was accompanied by a picture of a very oldschool and deceptive skimmer.  Ones of this size and bulk haven’t been used for many years and really do not suit the ATM at all.

If you follow the link at that Lifehacker article it takes you to a VERY good PDF document which demonstrates just how hard it is to spot modern skimming devices.  Most people wouldn’t do this though and just assume skimmers are still big bulky things as shown at the Lifehacker site.  A few more examples of current skimmers and a discussion about skimming after the break. Continue reading

And Murdoch wonders why people are turning away from newspapers?

media vs blogsI started my morning by screaming at my computer.  Not because someone was wrong on the internets, this time it was in outrage (yet again) at the hopelessness of the news media.

It was only a week ago I was ranting and raving on Twitter about how differently the same story was being reported by varying news outlets, some (ABC) making the science based medicine stories very negative while others (SMH, Telegraph, Reuters, AFP etc) giving a more realistic and positive story.  Today though it wasn’t so much the reporter’s incompetence or bias, but rather it was the sheer idiocy of the editor.

Hotmail: now Gmail and Yahoo! hacked

No, they weren’t hacked.  They weren’t cracked either.  Hacking and cracking both require a compromise of the business’ systems.  That in no way shape or form took place.  What happened is that the users were phished. Continue reading